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NFL Play 60 Youth Football Festival/NFL Draft Media Event @ Chelsea Waterside Park

My first editing project! Last week’s NFL Play 60 event from the NFL Draft media day. A great event at Chelsea Waterside Park that was attended by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, NFL Network’s Steve Mariucci, and former Dallas Cowboys Lavar Arington, Tony Casillas, and “Prime TimeDeion Sanders. All the top Draft prospects shared their time with the kids for a wonderful event. We get up close with Steve Mariucci, The Miami Dolphin‘s pick Deion Jordon, St. Louis Rams pick Tavon Martin, and the New York Jets pick Geno Smith. Also a few words from Prime Time himself, Deion Sanders.

NFL Play 60 Media Day April 24, 2013NFL Play 60 Media Day April 24, 2013NFL Play 60 Media Day April 24, 2013

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NFL Draft Prospects at NFL Play 60 Youth Football Festival

This past Wednesday I had the opportunity to join Dr. Bill Chackes, Zennie Abraham, Julie Buehler, and others at the NFL Draft Media day event which was held during the NFL Play 60 Youth Festival at Chelsea Waterside Park.  It was a busy morning with every member of the press looking to get some words from Andrew Luck and Robert Griffin III.

DSC_2515The Play 60 event was enjoyed by all the kids who participated and their families who watched.  Before the event, the kids had a chance to play Xbox 360 Kinnect games.  It got the kids going so they had energy for the real field.  All the players interacted with them in every capacity.  From throwing them passes to handing off the ball for running plays.  The kids ran combine drills and played small heads up games.

While the press flocked around RG3 and Andrew Luck for interviews, many of the other players stood waiting for their opportunity to be interviewed.  It took a while but every draft prospect did get their chance to answer questions.  It was hard to see some players just standing there with no one talking to them.  In the end, everyone had their quotes and every player was able to give their thoughts.

DSC_2499Roger Goodell thanked everyone for being there and the importance of the Play 60 program.  Mike Mayock of the NFL Network gave his opinions on the draft and where he thought the teams would find their best draft prospects.  It seemed more of a strategy session than an interview.

But in the end it was a success.  Not just for the NFL or the draft picks, but for the kids who participated.  The more interaction the players have with the youth of America, the more these kids will realize how important physical fitness is.

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Hierarchy & Ego Separate Jets Fans Rather Than Uniting Them

For the past three years I have met many fans while filming my documentary.  They have gone through many ups and downs over that time.  The announcement of the PSL’s, the destruction of an old stadium, the birth of a new one, overpaying just to keep their seats, and finally wondering if the lockout would have canceled the 2011 season.  Through all of that, fans could not stand united against the powers that be.  The people who pay to be in the building could never come together to be a united front to show what power they can truly posses.

Why is that you may ask.  Because there are many types of fans.  Some who feel they are more of an alpha fan.  More passionate, more loyal, just because they spend more than others.  That they mean more as a fan than other fans are.  Think George Orwell’s work of Animal Farm.  Where all fans are supposed to be equal.  Some fans are more equal than others.

Fans from teams from all leagues have this.  I can only speak about Jets fans since I have visited and spoken with many over the years.  All of them have their positives and negatives to say.  Not just about the team, but about each other.  When fans can not get along with each other, there is no way they could ever unite to show team owners they should be taken seriously.

I say this all now because of the lockout.  It left a bad taste in many peoples mouths.  Not just Jets and Giants fans.  It showed that the fans were thought of fifth or sixth, after all the money making issues.  Roger Goodell, owners, and players did want the season to happen so fans did not miss out on football in 2011.  But was that just good PR on their part or a show of genuine heart?  Fans were mixed.  Some thought they said it just to say it and others followed like sheep in a herd.

In my travels from tailgates to Jets rallies, the various fans have shown their true selves.  Some more down to earth than others.  Many older Jets fans, ones who have had tickets since Shea and earlier seem to be more humble.  Willing to share war stories of past gridiron battles.  There is a sense of pride in being a Jets fan there.  One can tell they are a fan and they feel no reason to boast or have a swagger about it.  Their dedication has shown for sticking with the Jets this long.    To them, they just want to see one more Super Bowl win.

One the flip side there are some fans since Shea who boast about being a fan so long.  Just because they feel they have been a fan longer than others.  They brag, boast, and jabber on about all the games they went to, where their seats, are and anything else they can say.  As if to say their time and seniority with the team makes them a bigger fan than many.  They will debate and argue that point until others see their view or concede.

More recent ticket holders have the “he who dies with the most toys wins” attitude.  He who holds more PSL’s & sits lower n the bowl spending more on their seats is the bigger fan.  These same people feel the more merchandise they own and show off it proves they are a bigger fan than others.  By showcasing their disposable income, they believe they look better and are seen as a bigger fan to others.  One can notice their bravado in their tailgate setups and how loud they are to others around them.

A few fans who travel to away games believe they are bigger fans as well.  They take the time to go to Miami, Indianapolis, Oakland, and other stadiums to see their beloved Jets.  For some odd reason, some believe that the more they spend on anything Jets related makes them a bigger fan.  One’s dedication to a team and sticking with them no matter what record they have should be reason enough to be a huge fan of the Jets.

Some fans believe that just because they write blogs or run websites it makes them a bigger fan than many.  I have heard from a few others and even in my own encounters.  There are a few that believe their own hype because they blog Jets information, claim to run the best tailgates and websites, and a few think they are “in the know” just because they run a blog.  Having a lot of followers on Twitter or having a few hundred hits per day on your blog does not make you a better fan than anyone else.

Apparently, there is one individual who runs a popular website and tailgates at every game.  from reports I have heard, this person believe others do not know how to tailgate the way he does.  Plus, he will verbally lash out at others who try to compare his tailgate to another.  Apparently, all this person can do is inflate his own ego and even goes on about it on his website.  He says his tailgate is the place to be and others are small in comparison.  Why would one care about what others do?  Is there that much riding on being the one who has the best tailgate and reports the most on the Jets at the same time?

In my own experience, I came across another blogger who carries a very “high and mighty” attitude.  This person blogs about Jets information, Jets training and Tweets regularly.  Now because this person is friends with other Jets bloggers and apparently knows certain Jets reporters in the true paid media, they feel they need to have a chip on their shoulder.  My friend Anthony thought the same opinion after meeting this person only once.

I can tell from this persons interaction with certain fans that they believe their own hype.  This person would only talk to certain fans and give the cold shoulder to many others.  It seemed this person thought they were better than the others in the area.  Even reading their blog and tweets one can see they think of themselves very highly.  When I attempted to follow this person on Twitter, even before meeting them,  I was blocked.  Why block a Jets fan from following another Jets fan?  Strange.

All Jets bloggers report the same information.  Predictions on games, thoughts on the offense and defense, re-reporting what Jets beat writers get paid to do for national and regional media, and other pertinent team info.  Occasionally blog writers will get interviews with players.  Just because one runs a blog does not make them a better Jets fan than anyone else.  It also does not put you on the same level as one who works for ESPN, NY Post, NY Times, CBS Sports, FOX Sports, etc.  It just means you have a voice on the internet, nothing more.

I know not everyone resembles the types I talked about.  There are so many others that do not fall into that mix.  I brought it up to prove a point.  The players can unite to fight for what they want.  The teams can come together and be on the same side in the battle against the players.  Fans will never be able to stand as one to show what type of a force they can be.  I mean after all, we spend the money to fill these stadiums and purchase their merchandise.  That totals up to more than a few hundred.

Many who have had season tickets for decades did not follow the team into the new stadium.  Not because they couldn’t afford it, but because they saw no need to.  One can still be a big Jets fan even though they are not a season ticket holder.  A few I have talked to who are well off financially did not purchase a PSL.  Even though they could, they thought it was a waste of a purchase or investment.  Not every fan has to follow the herd.
With the lockout, PSL’s, rate hikes, and so much more, fans will never be able to get together on any issue that affects them.  Many are either out for themselves or do whatever the team hands down.  They will pay whatever cost it takes to stay at the stadium.

One could say there is middle ground, the non PSL seats in the upper bowl.  There are few who have sense of mind not to follow & attend at any cost.  Many of those people are in the upper bowl or watching from their couch at home.

Imagine what a fans strike could actually do to a sports league.  It would show who really has power in a sport.  But there are too many fans and season ticket holders who would never do that.  They would complain that they have to pay for their tickets or payments to their PSL’s.  They would cringe at the fact of losing their hierarchy of social status in the Roman Coliseum at the Meadowlands.  Believing that paying for ones seats is more important than sticking up for ones beliefs.

I did not come here to abuse anyone or call anyone out.  I wanted to lay fact that while fans will complain about everything they can do nothing.  Not until we all see things the same way.  Until we put our egos and attitudes aside for one common purpose, each other.  That we all, as fans, will ALWAYS be in the same boat.  Paddling as hard as we can with our hands trying to catch up to the yacht filled with players and the luxury liner filled with team owners.

Players & Fans Wait Together On End To NFL Lockout

When sports crown a new NBA champion & NHL Stanley Cup winner, it begins the summer sports lull that is usually filled by the start of NFL mini-camps and the start of training camp.  A buzz normally fills the air on what teams are looking good in training camp, even before the preseason opener.

This year is different. This year we are being submitted to endless baseball highlights & whatever else ESPN can show during SportsCenter due to continued arguing over a billion dollar industry.  A summer that should be filled with players and teams preparing for gridiron battle.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has reduced his pay to $1 for the duration of the lockout. With each passing day not being paid, players miss out on crucial practices and playing tim. However, fans have it much worse: they are stuck at home with no hope of a Super Bowl come January. Stuck with Packers fans bragging about their epic title run.  Stuck talking about a season that may never come.

Goodell says that the lockout isn’t just to benefit players and owners though; fans will benefit as well.  Fans never benefit when players and owners talk about what money they are owed.

Fans wait to make certain decisions before the season starts.  What single games do they want to purchase, what away games to attend, what to buy in preparation for tailgating, when to buy that new HDTV, and other decisions usually made before football begins.

Certain fans have already given up their season tickets.  Some have had it with riisng ticket prices and others just feel the lockout was the last straw in seeing how little the fans mean to the NFL.  Some Jets fans have not just given up their seats, but trying to sell their PSL’s as well.

“That’s why we are trying to get a better economic model” Goodell told reporters last week. “And I think everyone understands that. You (the fans) are not being left out of the equation. The fans are a big part of that equation and a big part of the success of NFL football.”  He sees costs being passed down to the fan that would be prevented with a better business model.  Costs are already too high so any economic change for the fan is good.

Free agency is a critical time for teams to acquire new players to help supplement their squad. The big signings that occur every year and change the landscape of the NFL excite fans for the coming season. This is when we can stop talking about the Super Bowl champion and have a reason to feel that this year is different.

Last year former Carolina Panthers defensive end Julius Peppers was probably the biggest name amongst free-agent signees. Peppers went on to be a contributor for the Chicago Bears with 8 sacks against constant double teams. Bears fans were sure they were on the right path to win the big game.

Kenny Britt awaiting judges decision. Credit: NJ.com

This year it’s supposed to be whatever team can land Nnamdi Asomugha, a cornerback who has proven that he can shut down half the field. Unfortunately, he won’t find a home until the lockout finally comes to an end.  Same goes with the NFL rookies.  Drafted by their new organizaton, they can not be signed or talked to.

Our favorite players are also getting into trouble because they have too much time on their hands.  Tennessee Titans wide receiver Kenny Britt was charged with resisting arrest and tampering with evidence this week when he crushed a joint as police approached him.  The police didn’t find any drugs on him, but this is likely a situation that would have been avoided if players were focused on the season.

Now the Titans are entering the season with a diminished receiving group and are likely facing another sub-par year.  Less time to work with coaches, less time to improve.

Former Giants and Steelers wide receiver Plaxico Burress just got out of jail but can’t sign with a team because of the lockout.  The best he can do is workout and practice with others so he can get into some kind of playing shape.

Formerly a dynamic game changing receiver and Super Bowl hero, Burress will enthuse the fans of whatever team he goes to – if and when he does actually get signed.

I hope Goodell is sincere that the resulting post-lockout business model reduces costs that are being passed down to fans. We are the reason the league is so successful, and the more of the league year us fans lose to the lockout the more interested we will become in things not related to the NFL.  Goodell should learn from what happened to MLB and the NHL.

NFL Fans Ache From Their Favorite Teams

I normally write about the New York Jets and their fans.  The decisions the Jets organization makes and how it affects their season ticket holders.  The way fans prepare for home games and how they celebrate on the black top.  But now all football fans stand together.  Banded by our desire to watch the sport we love to only be shut out by a dispute between the players and their employers.

What you’re about to read focuses on give and take. So often is the case when professional sports franchises and money are involved, the customer winds up on the losing end.

The National Football League might not give its fans a single game this year. That hasn’t stopped almost all of its owners from taking money from their most loyal supporters.  We all remember what happened in 1987.  The owners still made money then in a makeshift season while fans suffered the first few games.

As if we needed another example of gang greed there’s this knee slapper: All but one of the NFL’s 32 teams is requiring season-ticket holders to submit deposits for next season, even though there might not be a season.

Only the New York Giants, the team of the late Wellington Mara, who long ago sacrificed for the good of the game and the welfare of the league, seems to understand that pay-for-play is the only plan that makes sense at this moment.

The late Leon Hess, former owner of the New York Jets, also had the same feelings.  He sent a letter to all season ticket holders saying he would not raise ticket prices until his team turned itself around on the field.

The Giants soon will send a letter to their 21,000 season ticket accounts, almost all of which have multiple ticket holders, saying that the team doesn’t think it’s right to take deposits while owners and players are firing insults over Twitter on how to share $9 billion in annual revenue.  The Giants are making themselves stand out from the other teams by showing a heart.

“Our season-ticket holders have made a significant financial commitment to our organization over the course of the last couple of years,” said Pat Hanlon, a spokesman for the Giants, who, along with the Jets, share the $1.6 billion New Meadowlands Stadium in New Jersey. “We just felt, given the circumstances, that it was the right thing to do and the fair thing to do.”

Doing Right

What we have here is something rarer than a Jets Super Bowl parade. We have a professional sports team showing more than a single shred  of concern for the customer, not only saying the right thing but doing it.  There is rarely seen in professional sports.  Something more team owners need to show to their season ticket holders.

Hanlon, a good company man, did his best to portray the other clubs kindly by saying what’s best for the Giants isn’t necessarily what other teams should do.  But it still shines a bad light on the others if only one team does the right thing by its fans.

“Each team has to operate within its own personality and its own way of handling its business,” he said.

Unfortunately, most professional sports teams have a default personality of greed. There’s no excuse for taking the deposit. Not that the NFL didn’t try to invent one, of course.

League spokesman Brian McCarthy said clubs believed there could be “operational issues” to not having season tickets renewed. You know, like getting commitments and processing payments in a short time after a settlement.  But with the layoffs it shows they really did not need those payments to keep their operations afloat.

Refund Policy

The Giants, according to Hanlon, have no such worries.  No Giants season ticket holder has never wanted their season tickets.

“The process we’ve established has addressed those concerns,” he said. So let’s get this straight: The Giants can solve the problem but the other teams can’t. Right.  Is this a case of greed or precaution?

It gets worse.

The NFL in November, anticipating a possible labor mess, disclosed its refund policy in the event of a lockout. The league mandate states that teams must issue full refunds no later than 30 days after final determination of how many games will be played during the 2011 season.

The league, however, allowed teams to set their own policies on whether ticket buyers should receive accrued interest on their deposits.  Which makes sense.  If the teams hold onto your money and make interest on it, the season ticket holder should be owed that accrued interest.

Let’s use the New England Patriots as an example. The Patriots in recent weeks sent three letters to their season ticket holders. The first was from NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, who outlined management’s side of the labor stalemate. The second came from Patriots owner Bob Kraft and his son, Jonathan, the club president, echoing much of the commissioner’s message.

Interest Due

And then the season-ticket renewal package arrived, requiring full payment by March 31. New England’s refund will include interest calculated at an annual rate of 1 percent. A check of bankrate.com shows that certain Banks offer a 1.08 percent return on a six-month certificate of deposit. It’s absurd that a team, like the Chicago Bears, which won’t give fans interest on their deposits, could make even a penny. It’s not about the money, which to someone with enough disposable income to buy tickets is negligible. It’s the principle.

The New York Jets are asking for 50% due by April 1st.  With PSL money still due later this year, the Jets still feel they need to hold onto the money rather than be on the same side as the Giants.  In the battle between the New York football clubs from the corporate offices, the Giants won this round.

It’s no surprise that the Giants are the only team making such a gesture to its fans. The team’s chief executive officer is John Mara, the oldest of his father’s 11 children. It was Wellington Mara who championed revenue sharing, even though it meant less for his team.  It shows in the fact the Giants used to have a 50 Years Club for season ticket holders who had season tickets for 50 plus years.  They cared about their long standing fans and still do, in a way.

Right and fair. Two important words. Just like give and take.

NFL Fans Should Pay For Their Tickets, Not Stadiums

The Georgia Dome in Atlanta remains a perfectly fine building for professional football. Still a teenager, it is nowhere near long in the tooth. Capacity is enough to accommodate nearly every Atlanta Falcons fan willing to buy tickets.

Arthur Blank, the team owner, craves a new stadium. That seems akin to trading in your car after it has logged only 20,000 miles, but he can well afford it.  Blank, the former owner of the ubiquitous American home improvement store chain called The Home Depot, has a net worth of $1.2 billion, according to Forbes, and the franchise value has risen 52 per cent since he bought it in 2002 for $545 million.

But wait. Blank expects the quasi-public agency that operates the Dome and the proposed site of a new stadium to issue bonds that would pay some of the costs. That should be 15 yards for unsportsmanlike conduct, sticking it to taxpayers at the same time that funding for public schools in Georgia is being cut.

This sickness is spreading among NFL team owners. In Minnesota, the Vikings’ Zygi Wilf has capitalized on the collapse of the Metrodome’s inflatable roof amid a once-in-a-lifetime snowstorm and the fear of the franchise relocating to Los Angeles in his campaign for a replacement stadium. Of course, citizens would contribute to the project. Never mind that Blank might expect Wilf, worth $1.3bn, to pick up their lunch bill.

The shameless nonchalance of these folks who seem detached from reality has generated a shifting of the winds.  We have already experienced it here in New York and New Jersey.

The public, which normally sides with management during labor disputes in American sports, is sympathetic toward the players in a stand-off with owners that has pushed the league to the brink of a lockout.  In a poll conducted by Seton Hall University, 35 per cent who participated backed the players, compared to 22 per cent for their bosses. This, even though the same study found that most contend the players are overpaid.

Taxpayers are increasingly fed up with being forced to become stadium-erecting partners with Rolex-wearing, yacht-sailing jet-setters. Economists nowadays agree on little, but one belief they share is that public support of professional sports offers almost nothing financially in return.

DSC05891

The Giants and Jets grew tired of their shared arena and convinced the government to pitch in for a new-and-improved one. The old Giants Stadium was torn down despite carrying more than $100m in debt that must be paid off by the good people of New Jersey.  Plus, the season ticket holders are also helping flip the bill on the new one with PSL’s.  Isn’t that double dipping?  The nerve!

Roger Goodell, the NFL commissioner, stands complicit in this wasteful building boom. From his office comes a wink-nod promise of the ultimate in ego gratification for owners: host your own Super Bowl! Just throw up a stadium and you will get the big game. How you bankroll it, that’s your business.

Which explains why the 2014 Super Bowl was awarded to New Meadowlands in a region where the average low temperature in February is -2°C.  Which also explains why 22 of 32 teams have moved into fresh digs or had their existing ones totally made over in the last two decades.

In that time, teams have been blessed with more than $7bn in taxpayer subsidies for construction and renovation, according to the NFL Players’ Association.

The players union reports that, on average, taxpayers put up 65 per cent of the financing for those projects. Owners found a way to avoid putting in any money for 10 of them; for nine others, their contribution amounted to less than 25 per cent.

Further driving public sentiment toward the players are reports on the sport’s inherent physical risk, particularly for victims of post-concussive syndrome that has ravaged retirees. Fans are looking beyond the average salary of $1.9m and discovering other statistics:

$770,000, the median yearly pay.  ŸThree-and-a-half years, the average length of career.  Eleven, the average number of players per team on injured reserve this past season.

While many of us might trade places with the players, the figures show that most of them accumulate more aches and pains than enough wealth to last them a lifetime.

For team owners, it is a different story. Admittance into the club all but guarantees going from rich to richer, experienced from the comfort of a stadium luxury suite.

Fine. That is the American way. But those who knock on government doors seeking handouts to finance mostly unnecessary arenas should instead heed the marketing message aimed at customers of Blank’s old home improvement stores.

Do it yourself.

Jets host Giants in Preseason Opener at New Stadium

Looks like the Jets will get to host the stadium's first game   afterall - in the preaseason. But Gang Green still has to share the   stage with Big Blue.

McIsaac/Getty

Looks like the Jets will get to host the stadium’s first game after all – in the preaseason. But Gang Green still has to share the stage with Big Blue.

The Giants and Jets have been preseason opponents for the last 41 years.  When they meet this August it will be an extra-special preseason game.  It’s the first football game being played at the new stadium in the Meadowlands the teams have built together.

Big Blue and Gang Green will kick off the NFL’s exhibition season on Monday, Aug. 16 with a nationally televised game on ESPN. It’s the Jets turn to be the home team this summer.

The series, which the Jets lead 22-18-1, has been played the next to last week of the preseason all but once since it began in 1969. The Jets have won the last three games, including a 27-25 victory last summer.

The NFL preseason schedule released yesterday matches the Giants against four AFC opponents — Baltimore, Pittsburgh, New England and the Jets. Only the date of the Jets game is set.  Games against the Steelers and Pats will be played in the still unnamed stadium built next to the old Giants Stadium.  That means the Giants make only one preseason road trip — to Baltimore the weekend of Aug. 26-29.  The Steelers game will be the weekend of Aug. 19-23, and the preseason finale with the Patriots Sept. 2-3.

The Jets will play at Carolina in the second week of the preseason, be at home against the Redskins the third week and finish at Philadelphia on Sept. 2. The dates and times for the games against the Panthers and Redskins and the time of the Eagles game will be announced at a later date.  It will be the first time the Jets have played Carolina.

It will be the 42nd consecutive year the Jets have played the Giants in the preseason.

The first sporting event in the new stadium will be a lacrosse tripleheader — The Big City Classic — on Sat., April 10, with one of the games pitting Princeton against Syracuse.  An international soccer match is scheduled their in June.

The Giants will play the first regular season game in the new Meadowlands Stadium on Sunday, Sept. 12. The Jets will open their regular season with the first Monday night game at the new stadium.

That decision caused some controversy, as NFL commissioner Roger Goodell flipped a coin to determine which would play first at home. The Giants won the toss, but Jets owner Woody Johnson was upset that a representative of the team was not present when the coin was flipped.

Jets To Play 1st Thanksgiving Game In New Stadium??

Though no official announcement has been made, by  process of elimination, all signs point to a Thanksgiving Day game featuring the Detroit Lions and the visiting New England Patriots.

From left, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, Jets owner Woody  Johnson and Giants Co-Owner John Mara might have a few awkward moments  the next time they are all in the same room.

Giancarli for News

From left, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, Jets owner Woody Johnson and Giants Co-Owner John Mara might have a few awkward moments the next time they are all in the same room.

With the New York Daily News’ report that the New York Jets will accept the NFL’s offer to host the Thanksgiving Day night game, the only other possible opponent for the Lions is New England.

As Mike Florio of NBC Sports explains, per network contracts, at least one AFC team must be playing in the Lions’  Thanksgiving game, to be broadcast on CBS. The only AFC opponents the Lions will play at home next season are the Patriots and the Jets, pointing to a Tom Brady-Matthew Stafford matchup at Ford Field on Nov. 25.

It will be the third Thanksgiving Day game between the two teams since 2000.  The Lions won the first meeting 34-9, with the Patriots evening the score by beating the Lions 20-12 in 2002.  The official announcement, including the Jets’ opponent on Thanksgiving, will be on Monday. The NFL will release the full regular season schedule in mid April.

Until then, here are the Lions’ 2010 opponents:

Home: Chicago Bears, Green Bay Packers, Minnesota Vikings, New England Patriots, New York Jets, Philadelphia Eagles, Washington Redskins, St. Louis Rams

Away: Chicago Bears, Green Bay Packers, Minnesota Vikings, Buffalo Bills, Miami Dolphins, Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Giants Get Home Opener; Jets Get MNF Opener

The New York Giants and New York Jets will both host games at their new home, Meadowlands Stadium, on the opening weekend of the 2010 regular season.

The Giants will play Sunday afternoon, September 12, and the Jets will play the following day in the first nationally televised Monday Night Football game of the season. Opponents will be announced soon, as the league is still completing the 2010 schedule.

New York Jets players take to the field for their final regular  season game at Giant Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, January 3,  2010 file photo. REUTERS/Ray Stubblebine

After deciding to have both teams play at home on opening weekend, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell resolved the issue of which team plays first with a coin flip.  Woody  Johnson has long been trying to get the Super Bowl to come to New York and the New York Daily News is reporting that Johnson’s sudden public outrage at Goodell may put the possibility of the big game coming to the Big Apple in jeopardy.

Goodell flipped the coin last Friday with his staff at the NFL office, then notified both teams.  But shouldn’t there have been at least one representative from each team been there to witness it?

In addition, the NFL announced that the Jets will host the first NFL game at the new stadium during the preseason in August.  That still does not sit well with Jets fans.  Jets fans took a back seat to Giants fans in Giants Stadium and it seems it is happening all over again.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s support for new Jets-Giants stadium bolsters 2014 Super Bowl bid

Credit:  Gary Meyers of the Daily News

FORT LAUDERDALE – It might not be a bad time to start saving up for tickets for Super Bowl XLVIII in 2014, because who knows how much they will cost by then. The venue: the Giants‘ and Jets’ new $1.7 billion stadium that opens for football in the fall.

Momentum is starting to build for the first Super Bowl in the Northeast and the first in a cold-weather climate in an open-air stadium.

The competition for the Meadowlands is Miami, Tampa and Glendale, Ariz. The Super Bowl is being played today in Miami for the second time in the last four seasons and a record 10th time in the first 44 games. Tampa had the Super Bowl twice in the last decade and Glendale had it just two years ago.

The vote is less than four months away and the longshot candidate from the greatest city in the world could be emerging as the favorite.

Roger Goodell‘s strong show of support Friday at his state-of-the-league news conference, with many NFL owners in attendance, is a real positive sign for the bid. It never hurts to have the commissioner on your side, even though he does not have a vote.

There will be a faction of owners who will get hung up on the weather and vote against the Super Bowl on Broadway, but in the end it’s likely that the respect for the late Wellington Mara, who helped make the league what it is today with his unselfish decision back in the early 1960s to endorse sharing network television money, and the late Robert Tisch, will get New York the votes.

The owners know how important it is for the Maras, Tisches and Woody Johnson to be awarded the Super Bowl in their new stadium, and the NFL has an unwritten policy: Build a state-of-the-art stadium and the Super Bowl will come.

So, my instincts tell me New York will be get the Super Bowl that will be played four years from now when the secret ballots are counted May 24-26 in Dallas.

But what about the fans? Is it fair to them to make them sit outside on a February evening? The corporate types may not want to rough it, but the average fan in the metropolitan area is pretty hearty.

Jon Tisch, the co-chairman of the committee to get the bid, revealed to the Daily News elements of the plan to deal with inclement weather as it relates to fan comfort:

- Heated open concourses.

- Fire pits in the parking lot for tailgaters.

- Hand and feet warmers.

- Blankets.

- Thermal socks.

- Self-warming seat cushions.

*Dec 08 - 00:05*

Steve Tisch (from l.), John Mara and Woody Johnson should start preparing to host Super Bowl at their new stadium in 2014.

Even for 82,500 fans, that still comes out a lot cheaper than the $400 million-$500 million it would have cost to put a roof on the stadium.